X

Forgot your Password

If you have forgotten your password, please enter your account email below and we will reset your password and email you the new password.

X

Login to SciCrunch

X

Register an Account

Delete Saved Search

Are you sure you want to delete this saved search?

NO

NIF LinkOut Portal

FILTERS

Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is a determinant of cell size and glucose homeostasis.

Authors:
Ruvinsky I, Sharon N, Lerer T, Cohen H, Stolovich-Rain M, Nir T, Dor Y, Zisman P, Meyuhas O
Affiliation:
Journal:
Genes & development

Abstract

The regulated phosphorylation of ribosomal protein (rp) S6 has attracted much attention since its discovery in 1974, yet its physiological role has remained obscure. To directly address this issue, we have established viable and fertile knock-in mice, whose rpS6 contains alanine substitutions at all five phosphorylatable serine residues (rpS6(P-/-)). Here we show that contrary to the widely accepted model, this mutation does not affect the translational control of TOP mRNAs. rpS6(P-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) display an increased rate of protein synthesis and accelerated cell division, and they are significantly smaller than rpS6(P+/+) MEFs. This small size reflects a growth defect, rather than a by-product of their faster cell division. Moreover, the size of rpS6(P-/-) MEFs, unlike wild-type MEFs, is not further decreased upon rapamycin treatment, implying that the rpS6 is a critical downstream effector of mTOR in regulation of cell size. The small cell phenotype is not confined to embryonal cells, as it also selectively characterizes pancreatic beta-cells in adult rpS6(P-/-) mice. These mice suffer from diminished levels of pancreatic insulin, hypoinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance.

MGI Links

  1. Welcome

    Welcome to NIF. Explore available research resources: data, tools and materials, from across the web

  2. Community Resources

    Search for resources specially selected for NIF community

  3. More Resources

    Search across hundreds of additional biomedical databases

  4. Literature

    Search Pub Med abstracts and full text from PubMed Central

  5. Insert your Query

    Enter your search terms here and hit return. Search results for the selected tab will be returned.

  6. Join the Community

    Click here to login or register and join this community.

  7. Categories

    Narrow your search by selecting a category. For additional help in searching, view our tutorials.

  8. Query Info

    Displays the total number of search results. Provides additional information on search terms, e.g., automated query expansions, and any included categories or facets. Expansions, filters and facets can be removed by clicking on the X. Clicking on the + restores them.

  9. Search Results

    Displays individual records and a brief description. Click on the icons below each record to explore additional display options.

X