X

Forgot your Password

If you have forgotten your password, please enter your account email below and we will reset your password and email you the new password.

X

Login to SciCrunch

X

Register an Account

Delete Saved Search

Are you sure you want to delete this saved search?

NO

NIF LinkOut Portal

FILTERS

T cells develop normally in the absence of both Deltex1 and Deltex2.

Authors:
Lehar SM, Bevan MJ
Affiliation:
Journal:
Molecular and cellular biology

Abstract

Deltex1, Deltex2, and Deltex4 form a family of related proteins that are the mammalian homologues of Drosophila Deltex, a known regulator of Notch signals. Deltex1 is highly induced by Notch signaling in thymocytes, and overexpression of Deltex1 in T-cell progenitors can block Notch signals, suggesting that Deltex1 may play an important role in regulating Notch signals during T-cell development. A recent report found that T cells develop normally in mice carrying a targeted deletion in the Deltex1 gene (S. Storck, F. Delbos, N. Stadler, C. Thirion-Delalande, F. Bernex, C. Verthuy, P. Ferrier, J. C. Weill, and C. A. Reynaud, Mol. Cell. Biol. 25: 1437-1445, 2005), suggesting that other Deltex homologues may compensate in Deltex1-deficient T cells. We generated mice that lack expression of both Deltex1 and Deltex2 by gene targeting and further reduced expression of Deltex4 in Deltex1/Deltex2 double-deficient T-cell progenitors using RNA interference. Using a sensitive in vitro assay, we found that Notch signaling is more potent in cells expressing lower levels of Deltex proteins. Nevertheless, we were unable to detect any significant defects in thymocyte maturation in Deltex1/Deltex2 double-knockout mice. Together these data suggest that Deltex can act as a negative regulator of Notch signals in T cells but that endogenous levels of Deltex1 and Deltex2 are not important for regulating Notch signals during thymocyte development.

  1. Welcome

    Welcome to NIF. Explore available research resources: data, tools and materials, from across the web

  2. Community Resources

    Search for resources specially selected for NIF community

  3. More Resources

    Search across hundreds of additional biomedical databases

  4. Literature

    Search Pub Med abstracts and full text from PubMed Central

  5. Insert your Query

    Enter your search terms here and hit return. Search results for the selected tab will be returned.

  6. Join the Community

    Click here to login or register and join this community.

  7. Categories

    Narrow your search by selecting a category. For additional help in searching, view our tutorials.

  8. Query Info

    Displays the total number of search results. Provides additional information on search terms, e.g., automated query expansions, and any included categories or facets. Expansions, filters and facets can be removed by clicking on the X. Clicking on the + restores them.

  9. Search Results

    Displays individual records and a brief description. Click on the icons below each record to explore additional display options.

X