NIF LinkOut Portal

Options
Only Pubmed Central
Include Pubmed Central
Sections
Title
Abstract
Introduction
Methods
Results
Supplement
Appendix
Contributions
Background
Commentary
Funding
Limitations
Caption
FILTERS

PhenCode: connecting ENCODE data with mutations and phenotype.

Authors:
Giardine B, Riemer C, Hefferon T, Thomas D, Hsu F, Zielenski J, Sang Y, Elnitski L, Cutting G, Trumbower H, Kern A, Kuhn R, Patrinos GP, Hughes J, Higgs D, Chui D, Scriver C, Phommarinh M, Patnaik SK, Blumenfeld O, Gottlieb B, Vihinen M, Väliaho J, Kent J, Miller W, Hardison RC
Affiliation:
Journal:
Human mutation

Abstract

PhenCode (Phenotypes for ENCODE; http://www.bx.psu.edu/phencode) is a collaborative, exploratory project to help understand phenotypes of human mutations in the context of sequence and functional data from genome projects. Currently, it connects human phenotype and clinical data in various locus-specific databases (LSDBs) with data on genome sequences, evolutionary history, and function from the ENCODE project and other resources in the UCSC Genome Browser. Initially, we focused on a few selected LSDBs covering genes encoding alpha- and beta-globins (HBA, HBB), phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), blood group antigens (various genes), androgen receptor (AR), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), but we plan to include additional loci of clinical importance, ultimately genomewide. We have also imported variant data and associated OMIM links from Swiss-Prot. Users can find interesting mutations in the UCSC Genome Browser (in a new Locus Variants track) and follow links back to the LSDBs for more detailed information. Alternatively, they can start with queries on mutations or phenotypes at an LSDB and then display the results at the Genome Browser to view complementary information such as functional data (e.g., chromatin modifications and protein binding from the ENCODE consortium), evolutionary constraint, regulatory potential, and/or any other tracks they choose. We present several examples illustrating the power of these connections for exploring phenotypes associated with functional elements, and for identifying genomic data that could help to explain clinical phenotypes.

  1. Welcome

    Welcome to NIF. Explore available research resources: data, tools and materials, from across the web

  2. Community Resources

    Search for resources specially selected for NIF community

  3. More Resources

    Search across hundreds of additional biomedical databases

  4. Literature

    Search Pub Med abstracts and full text from PubMed Central

  5. Insert your Query

    Enter your search terms here and hit return. Search results for the selected tab will be returned.

  6. Join the Community

    Click here to login or register and join this community.

  7. Categories

    Narrow your search by selecting a category. For additional help in searching, view our tutorials.

  8. Query Info

    Displays the total number of search results. Provides additional information on search terms, e.g., automated query expansions, and any included categories or facets. Expansions, filters and facets can be removed by clicking on the X. Clicking on the + restores them.

  9. Search Results

    Displays individual records and a brief description. Click on the icons below each record to explore additional display options.

X