X

Forgot your Password

If you have forgotten your password, please enter your account email below and we will reset your password and email you the new password.

X

Login to SciCrunch

X

Register an Account

Delete Saved Search

Are you sure you want to delete this saved search?

NO

NIF LinkOut Portal

FILTERS

Lafora disease proteins malin and laforin are recruited to aggresomes in response to proteasomal impairment.

Authors:
Mittal S, Dubey D, Yamakawa K, Ganesh S
Affiliation:
Journal:
Human molecular genetics

Abstract

Lafora disease (LD), an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic polyglucosan inclusions known as Lafora bodies in several tissues including the brain. Laforin, a protein phosphatase, and malin, an ubiquitin ligase, are two of the proteins that are known to be defective in LD. Malin interacts with laforin and promotes its polyubiquitination and degradation. Here we show that malin and laforin co-localize in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that they form centrosomal aggregates when treated with proteasomal inhibitors in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Laforin/malin aggregates co-localize with gamma-tubulin and cause redistribution of alpha-tubulin. These aggregates are also immunoreactive to ubiquitin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, ER chaperone and proteasome subunits, demonstrating their aggresome-like properties. Furthermore, we show that the centrosomal aggregation of laforin and malin is dependent on the functional microtubule network. Laforin and malin form aggresome when expressed together or otherwise, suggesting that the two proteins are recruited to the centrosome independent of each other. Taken together, our results suggest that the centrosomal accumulation of malin, possibly with the help of laforin, may enhance the ubiquitination of its substrates and facilitate their efficient degradation by proteasome. Defects in malin or laforin may thus lead to increased levels of misfolded and/or target proteins, which may eventually affect the physiological processes of the neuron. Thus, defects in protein degradation and clearance are likely to be the primary trigger in the physiopathology of LD.

  1. Welcome

    Welcome to NIF. Explore available research resources: data, tools and materials, from across the web

  2. Community Resources

    Search for resources specially selected for NIF community

  3. More Resources

    Search across hundreds of additional biomedical databases

  4. Literature

    Search Pub Med abstracts and full text from PubMed Central

  5. Insert your Query

    Enter your search terms here and hit return. Search results for the selected tab will be returned.

  6. Join the Community

    Click here to login or register and join this community.

  7. Categories

    Narrow your search by selecting a category. For additional help in searching, view our tutorials.

  8. Query Info

    Displays the total number of search results. Provides additional information on search terms, e.g., automated query expansions, and any included categories or facets. Expansions, filters and facets can be removed by clicking on the X. Clicking on the + restores them.

  9. Search Results

    Displays individual records and a brief description. Click on the icons below each record to explore additional display options.

X