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Abnormal maternal behaviour and growth retardation associated with loss of the imprinted gene Mest.

Authors:
Lefebvre L, Viville S, Barton SC, Ishino F, Keverne EB, Surani MA
Affiliation:
Journal:
Nature genetics

Abstract

Mest (also known as Peg1), an imprinted gene expressed only from the paternal allele during development, was disrupted by gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The targeted mutation is imprinted and reversibly silenced by passage through the female germ line. Paternal transmission activates the targeted allele and causes embryonic growth retardation associated with reduced postnatal survival rates in mutant progeny. More significantly, Mest-deficient females show abnormal maternal behaviour and impaired placentophagia, a distinctive mammalian behaviour. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of an imprinted gene in the control of adult behaviour.

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